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Tuesday, 05 August 2008 16:27

The Top 5 Myths About Oily/Acne Skin

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A chronic dermatologic condition such as acne can leave both physical and emotional scars on teens, especially in a society that values appearance so highly. Acne is the most common skin disease in the U.S., affecting more than 17 million teens and young adults. Compounding the difficulties with the problem is the tremendous amount of misinformation that still persists. In order to set the record straight, here are some of the most common myths you're likely to hear.

Myth # 1: acne is caused by diet. Extensive scientific studies have not found a single connection between diet and acne. In other words, chocolate, french fries, pizza and other fast foods do not cause acne. It does make sense to limit fatty foods to prevent obesity and cardiovascular disease, however. Studies have shown that foods with a high iodine content (such as shellfish) may aggravate existing acne, but does not cause it.
Myth #2: you just have to let acne run its course. The truth is, acne can be cleared up. If the acne products you have tried haven't worked, consider seeing a licensed skin care specialist. With the products available today, there is no reason why someone has to endure acne or get acne scars.
Myth #3: if your parents had acne, there is a good chance you will have it too. Some families may have certain skin conditions that predispose their children to acne. Therefore, this final "myth" may be true!
Myth # 4: applying moisturizer will make your skin breakout. To the contrary, the right moisturizer will help to slow oil production, suppress bacteria and act like a mop for excessive oil. In addition it’s vital to the healing process for skin to be well hydrated.
Myth # 5: sunscreen will clog pores and cause acne breakout. Some sunscreens have a heavy greasy feel and can clogg pores but there are new oil free sun protection formulations for oily skin that help the healing process by protecting the skin against immuno-suppression from UV light rays.